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with. the presiding officer: without objection. the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, i have listened to the senator from ohio, and i really want to be heard because he's talking about the fiscal cliff and how upset he is at the thought that the wealthiest people in america might go back to the tack rates we had under bill clinton when we had the greatest prosperity, we had 23 million new jobs, and we balanced the budget to the point where we even had a surplus. and my friend comes down here and he's complaining that the proposal on the table would give 98% of the people a tax cut, and he's upset that 2% of the people might have to go back to the rates under bill clinton. well, i just want to say something. we just had an election. we had a big election. we had a tough election. we had an expensive election. and one of the major parts of that election revolved around what do we do about the deficits, what do we do about economic growth, what do we do about spending, and we discussed it in the senate races, we discussed it in the house races, and of course president ob
-span. next is felix from california. caller: good morning. i mean democratic voter. -- i am an independent voter. what i heard from joe biden today is the fact that the problem we have always had is that the problems were caused by a republican. mitt romney -- host: thanks for the call. good afternoon caroline. caller: i am proud to be what i am. host: go ahead with your thoughts on this election. caller: my thought right now is joe biden >> tomorrow night watch election results from the presidential race as well as house, senate and governors contest across the country. we'll have coverage of president obama in chicago and the mitt romney in boston. victory and concession speeche speeches,. >> we are engaged in the process and been working first in with fema, to make an overall assessment, that 25, up to 25% of those cell towers were disabled during this process. what the fcc does and will continue to do is to work with these entities, to assess the situation on the ground and to more so use this information to see where we can do adequate for. >> commissioner mignon clyburn on issues fac
was just in california last week and we need to compete across the country that involves investment technology and it starts in grades k-12. to talk about jobs for people in their 20s and 30s, that is important. but we will not be competitive in the global marketplace we don't focus on it here at home. >> moderator: charlie summers? summers: our government has not been able to work together because of what everyone said. we are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax reform that makes sense. inefficiently accumulates revenue and is evenly distributed. what we need to do is make sure that we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the misallocation of resources that we see to our government, as for instance in benghazi, when they drew down thousands of marine from iraq. we can have more independence there to make sure that the parties know that there is someone else available to take their place. >> moderator: let's move onto the next question right now. -- go ahead, really quickly -- okay. >> i have campaigned all over the state. some people ha
won this election by a 50-48% margin. debts may go up to around it 50-48 when the folks in california command and last time it took five weeks to count their votes. they count them in five hours in brazil so i'm not sure why california's less technologically advanced but there we are. all these figures are incomplete as they replied -- it appears obama will get a huge electoral vote advantage and out of this relatively narrow popular vote margin. assuming that he carries florida where he is the current ahead in the miami-dade county. people are are this year counting votes without the assistance of many republican and democratic lawyers. with florida his electoral vote victory is 332-206. bush was 51-48 margin in 2004 india 286 votes and obama was slightly less it appears against 332. i think there is a certain structure of demographic advantage for democrats in the electoral college in this era. democratic voters tend to be clustered into large metropolitan areas and in particular neighborhoods and they give them a craft an initial advantage in the electoral college. president obama
. i live in mississippi but i'm retired federal firefighter from california. and disasters, whether it's hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, whatever, most jurisdictions find that they're overwhelmed by the time it happens because disasters overwhelm every jurisdiction. so whether you're in new york or down in the coast of mississippi, the jurisdictions that are in charge of trying to mitigate these problems are so overwhelmed, and most are victims themselves. we need a national -- we need a national fire disaster program that exists within the federal government. the resources are there without going to a lot of expense. all disasters is similar to what would happen in a motel. a hotel, if everybody goes into a hotel, they see on the door what to do when a fire starts, how to get out, the hallways are designed to carry the capacity of the people, and so forth. and then once they're out they need to be accounted for. and he'd have an emergency service that can come in and mitigate the problem. most jurisdictions do not have the resources to do this. when it comes to police a
and kirkpatrick democratic candidate and jonathan hunton, a republican event in california 26th district also the democratic when julie of the tony strickland, the republican, and then also michigan first dan, the republican in a four way race is the victor in michigan first district. those are some of the races that have been called. there are a few other out standing once. go to our website come c-span.org, and then also as i told you yesterday in the presidential race, in florida has yet to be called here is the absentee ballot voting delay to push right on the floor of the election. we don't know where the 29 electoral votes will go but have made every outcome of the presidential election. back to the topic here. what was your message to washington? a lot of newspaper articles this morning about the fiscal the cliff and that is what faces -- >> we will leave this portion of this morning's washington journal now to go live to the american enterprise institute for panel discussions on the election with fox news channel commentator michael barone, inside out columnist norman borkenstein and
society organizations which also features the involvement of the university of california san diego. working with the local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security so there are a lot of bottom-up approach is in changing the securities sector. in addition to the high level of policies that we have been discussing such as the initiatives for the police. >> okay. let's take this as our final question and then one more large question to pose to the panel before we break. >> my name is jason, an independent researcher and consultant on issues around policing and the conflict. my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will tweak it for to tunisia. i'm glad he mentioned his paper. it highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya conducting a light footprint and not the kosovo or afghanistan model with hundreds of thousands of people on the ground. and what sort of pushed the democratization and the ssr forward. so i guess the question for bob is what are the considerations to be engaged the conflict, post conflict ssr. what can
are not an outlet. we are a program at the university of california, a graduate program that does reporting, but we are working with different organizations. we do not really have an initiative, per said, but there are organizations that are doing incredible work with citizens. "the guardian" in the u.k. is the best example of a large organization that works with citizens on a huge scale. one of the things they did in the last couple years was pulled from public records about the way their politicians are spending money. millions of documents. they created a form and citizens volunteered to go through those millions of documents and competed. it was amazingly successful. i do not know how many thousands of people participated, but it was a lot. "the guardian" is very innovative. american journalists are trying to find ways to do this -- to engage citizens. we do not get a lot of cold calls or tips, but we never ignore. i do not know if there are journalists out there -- we never ignore a tip. i do not care how crazy it seems, how far-fetched -- we always follow up. you'll be surprised at how many a
, a little california adventure, to mar run county, california, after being in manhattan or brooklyn for 21, 22 years. >> host: why'd you move out there? >> guest: we wanted to try something different. our kids were at a nice age where they were out of diapers, but today didn't yet have girlfriends -- [laughter] and we have three boys. and we have this nice thing where we can kind of live anywhere because we have a lot of flexibility. i don't have to go into a office, my wife -- who used to work at mtv -- isn't working there now. and so -- >> host: may we ask who your wife is? >> guest: my wife is alexa robinson, she was a producer at mtv. she wasn't a vijay. >> host: okay. >> guest: and she -- and so we wanted to try and go on some kind of adventure with the kids to take advantage of the fact that we can live anywhere. and i've always loved northern california, and i have a lot of friends out there. because of all the technology projects that i've been involved with and things that i've written about, you know, it was helpful professionally to be out there for a while. so we've been off on
.c. for a while, moved to california. i was married for a while in california and then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again. and now, i'm about to get married again. [laughter] thank you. >> hopefully to the same guy. [laughter] don't forget that. >> you don't gets gifts every time either. that's the problem. so i did have this very, i certainly had a personal thing in that so i was very pleasantly surprised on that side and i do think that also, i want to look at this, but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the prior polling in the actual voting wasn't as big as it has in the pass which past which suggests to the extent that people were saying kind of different things to survey takers than they were, if that ever was true, it feels like in this race are polling rejected that which was the margin and we won by the margin close to the polling. i think if that is true that is very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thing. i think there was a tendency for us to have to feel that we had to really get very high numbers. and so that was good news. >> i was
, um, in california we haven't adopted charter schools and vouchers and choice as much as you have experienced in washington d.c. my belief is that when we introduce choice, um, the public schools will rise, the bar will rise for the public schools because then they have to keep up with the charter schools and the voucher schools that parents elect to go to. is that a belief that you experienced in washington, d.c.? what happened to the public schools and how they performed when that 42% that you mentioned earlier came into place? >> yeah, it absolutely makes a difference. i don't think that you can have reform in education without choice, and frankly, without choice there won't be an incentive for the bureaucracy to change. i mean, look, it's easy for people to fall into the category of, you know, you're bashing teachers. they say if you want change, you push the change, you're not supporting public schools. i support public schools. when i was in office, i gave the teachers the largest raise they ever got. i gave the schools more money than they asked for, and over the period of
proud that in california, our delegation of democrats is a majority of women, not even counting our two senators, senator feinstein and senator boxer. so women are empowered in california. i also want to acknowledge that although our number are great, two of our colleagues have gone on to the senate. senator baldwin -- [applause] >> we are very proud of that. senator-elect -- [applause] only the second woman of color to serve in the senate. so that's pretty exciting. and, unfortunately, we won't have capital coal -- kathy local and betty sutton in this next congress, but the future is soon and coming upon us and we know they will be making a great public contribution. so here we are. in the past week since the election were still finishing up some of our campaigns. we are very proud of the success or as i said yesterday, and as you see here today. why is it important for us to make this statement of the strength of women in the congress of the united states, of the house democratic women? because this is where hopes and dreams of america's families are rising. they may not know that. th
in a place in california. i actually worked on another story about the bohemian grove so i know the place well. >> host: a men's club? >> guest: all men, 2,000 men together at a summer camp, and they do it every year as there was a bohemian club in san fransisco hosting this con fab of corporate decision makers, government luminaries, diplomats, very, very important people, probably the equivalent today of, you know, some of the big events that happen in aspen, and out, you know, when you see folks in shirt sleeves rubbing elbows with each other. jackson, actually, was coming out in august of that year, 195 #, to -- 1952, to do that. his professor said, first, he asked jackson, there was a ground breaking of the law school, will you speak? jackson agreed. then the professor surprised rehnquist saying i'm going to arrange for you to meet him. the interesting thing is that rehnquist did meet him, and method with jackson, and jackson just kind of didn't even interview him. rehnquist had a swedish an sees rights movement, -- ancestry, which he talked about always, and so jackson got off on a
. on marriage they were decisive to pass proposition 8 in california, 50% voted for proposition 8 in california. we are extremely conservative and we also have to understand that there's a big difference between the old latino community of some 20 or 30 years ago what i call the cesar chavez latino community, the puerto ricans in new york and chicago and those in the southwest since the u.s. basically took half of mexico and the new population which is 40% foreign-born and the rest of the children of immigrants come a very conservative i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary that we get caught up in the polls we've seen it in this election cycle and besides pulling them with specific issues if we had a better understanding of what they are coming from you would get an understanding of why they are answering the question, but i believe with the latino community we lost the vote because of immigration. if we would have had a better position on immigration from the get go come from the primary government romney would have been competitive in those battle
to guess? [laughter] california. who would have thought? >> i would have thought new york. >> yeah, exactly. >> because of you. >> no. [laughter] of course, because of subways, but this is nontransportation. why? california's per capita -- 40% of our energy consumption is heating and cooling buildings where they be residential, commercial or factory. 35% is transportation. and california in 1978 passed building standards under then-governor brown who was known partially for this in the doons bury as governor moon beam. but he got it passed, so every new building in california had to meet energy efficiency standards. it's made california very efficient. these are the kinds of things, and as i said, portman and shaheen have been working on a compromise on this. these are the kinds of things we can do to make ourselves energy independent. my view, look, katrina -- sorry, sandy gave some impetus to dealing with climate change. and i said in new york we're going to pay for climate change one way or the ore. we can pay for it after each natural disaster. we in new york have had 50 -- sorry, we ha
's called california. it's called maryland coming and i don't see any reason why we don't wait two years to see whether how california is doing with their new higher marginal tax rates on folks and sales taxes on middle-income people as well and sales taxes and maryland raising the tax on guys that made a million come to madrid 50, and they are down to under 50 tax in maryland because they can't leave. they make a million dollars and they can walk across the border. so, we are seeing some very -- people are testing obama's peery in the state and i think we should do it on a small state like vermont at first and see how it works. whereas texas and florida are giving an idea of how you can govern without an income tax. people moved. we kind of know what is going to happen here. indiana, illinois, big border. they just past the right to work and they're giving the school kids a choice of a falter scholarship. illinois raised taxes want to inform the government worker pension system. who is going to build a factory in the 100 miles on the western side of the border? any takers for the people
to life. on marriage, latinos were decisive to pass proposition eight in california, 53% of latinos voted for proposition eight in california. we are extremely conservative. i think, and we also have to understand there's some difference between the old latino community of say 20, 30 years ago what i call the cesar chavez a team community, and, the new york, the puerto ricans in new york and chicago, and those in the southwest, been in the u.s. since the was basically took half of mexico. and the new latino population which is foreign-born, 40% foreign-born, and the rest of the children of immigrants. very conservative. i know when asked about government they may give answers that are not extraordinary, but sometimes we get tangled, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we
of town meetings and they work incredibly well here. and california is other traditions people can build on. but if they can look inside in order to be a valuable process chemists and he needs to be inclusive, deliberative and needs to be empowered. that provides enough of a firmer are people too sad, you know, here's how we can do it in our area. but enough to to have town meetings and apples. we cannot larges and some other process in california piece of people can take the installation and use it wherever they are to the democratic possibility that rises up locally and hopefully in some ways that can have an impact on the national conversation. >> here we go. i am a librarian for the vermont historical society. we are in the fault of vermont history center. we have a photo album created by a vermonter who went down to view and take pictures of vermont troops during the civil war. he presented the supplements u.s. in 1863 after he had returned from his third trip to virginia, taking pictures mostly of vermonters in camp, but also some other scenes that he saw. one of the scenes that of
. i met a woman in california who was adopted in her 40's because she was reunited with a woman who used to care for her, she grew up in foster care, became successful but when they were reunited they still loved each other the same way they had done 40 years earlier and decided to be a family. it's quite a miracle of loving and bonding that happens through adoption. frank and i, my lus and i are so proud to be the parents of two extraordinary chirp who happen to be adopted. we've built our family through adoption. my husband was, in fact, adopted out of an orphanage from ireland when he was 5 years old and still remembers the day when the may tron of this little brought assistant home for children came up and walked up to him and said ernest, pack your bags, your mom and dad are here to take you home. he saw his mother and father, adoptive mother and daughter father, brother and sister, and the rest is history, came to america and received an excellent education, has gone on to be a wonderful, wonderful citizen, of course, a great father and loving husband. so grateful for that opp
yield the floor. the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. boxer: mr. president, i'm going to be very proud to support amendment 2985. i think it has to do with our military readiness. i think it has to do with our national security. and i think the fact that we have this opportunity is commendable, and i want to thank senator udall for it. striking section 313 is important because that section harms d.o.d.'s ability to diversify its fuel supplies by developing and using effective alternative fuels. now, you know, lots of colleagues can come down here and proclaim thi this isn't important or it is important. you know what? i want to listen to the d.o.d. themselves and what they say. there was an armed forces press service news report in july 2012. and this is what they said: and i quote -- "smart investing and less reliance on petroleum-based fuels will help ensure an agile, lethal and adaptable combat force and ultimately national security. " so, mr. president -- mr. president, i was distraught when i heard that the armed services committee by one vote put in this
. when he retired, he had health insurance from his employer in california, and then he had a massive heart attack and surgery, and they canceled his insurance. my very conservative republican brother who had no use for social programs started counting the days until he was eligible for medicare. that was the only place he could turn. what was at stake were all of the savings he put together for his family. so we would talk on if anybody doesn't talk about a later eligibility age for medicare, what i want to hear is the assurance and guarantee that people like my brother will have access to affordable health care and insurance during any interim period of time from retirement and to actually qualify for medicaid. and intelligent that, i'm skeptical. i want to see more before. let me also say when it comes to medicare that their savings to be had there. savings that were brought up by the simpson-bowles commission to i will go through it, but savings that will not compromise the care and benefits to beneficiaries, but can lead to real efficiencies and delivery of health care. award abo
house seats, half their games have to do with, come from illinois and california in a largely redistricting game or so you democrats made small gains in house by the republicans still control the house. what would you say was the democrats message this election cycle, in terms of issues or policy? they talk about republican extremism, but wasn't there messaging two-pronged message of the congressional message? it also reflected in the presidential, but wasn't there messaging two-pronged? one, medicare, and two, the ryan budget or that was basically the democrats message. the republicans are for millionaires. look out the ryan budget. they want tax cuts for millionaires and they want to cut programs for the middle-class. and medicare is one of the examples, and the ryan budget showed different priorities and the republican priorities are wrong. that message did not really work. it was not a decisive win, sorting out the house level, for that message. and think of this to my editor, i've got to credit my editor at roll call who mentioned this to me as us going out the door last
, and i think by the time we report all vote in california, the west coast states that do a lot of absentee voting, the president's marginal grow a bit and i think we'll end up with a margin between obama and romney about 3.5%. so still close but not racist impose a not as close as we might've been talking about for a good deal of the election. i think of something right about all the model going on. i know a lot of people talked about that. i want to give a little shout out to many political scientist. i'm a political scientist. sometimes i'm critical of some of their models, but political models try to predict what happens in elections and they usually have some very simple components. how the president is doing. the growth in the economy. not the state of the economy. not the number of unemployment at how we've been improving over the are, and incumbents usually accounts or something. if you look at this election you can say a little bit of growth matters. a president who was sort of in the middle, 48, 49% job approval rating for much of this year, and about 1.5% growth, we a
to regulate the means of production of our agriculture products. a state like california might be fine that has defined a is coming to california shall be raised by hansen student cage size. start out being free range. nancy pelosi impose free range hens from exum re- -- in the captors in the building is remember. that california agenda violates the commerce clause of the constitution that where interstate commerce is regulate exclusively by congress, not the state. and our founding fathers understood but it needs to be stuck. i did put an amendment on the farm bill called the pike and mimic to protect interstate commerce an amendment which prohibits the states from regulating the means of production of our act product but there's a list that exists in the code. so that takes the states like california and arizona and florida out of the business of telling us, and iowa, how we're going to raise hands and produce eggs and how we're going to raise cattle and raise hogs. that's an important piece that as many fight in this campaign to go to have a lot of play in the press but that somethi
the roll. quorum call: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. feinstein: i ask the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. feinstein: i ask that senator baucus are added as a cosponsor of my amendment, 3018. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. feinstein: i also ask a u.c., dorothy engelhart from my office be granted floor privileges during the remainder of the debate on this pill. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. feinstein: thank you. i yield the floor. i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. levin: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that further proceedings under the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. levin: i ask it be in order for senator leahy to call up amendment 2955 and the time until 6:00 p.m. be equally divided in the usual form, that at 6:00 p.m. the senate proceed to a vote in relation to the leahy amendment number 2955, further, that there be no amendments in order to the
features the involvement of the professor from the university of california. working with local communities to rethink and refrain the perception and understanding of, you know, neighborhood security and human security so there are a lot of bottom-up approaches to changing the perception and changing the securities sector and you see some of these efforts happening in addition to the high level policies of that we have been discussing such as the police for egypt. >> thank you, hesham. i don't know if you have anything. okay let's take this final question and then i have one more very last question to pose to the panel before we close. >> good morning. my name is jason come independent researcher and consultant on issues mainly around policing conflict. so, my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will we get a little bit four tunisia. you know, he mentioned his paper and highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya and with a light footprint. not a kosovo or afghanistan or the iraq model where we have thousands of content and hundreds of thousands of people on the ground to be a
. panetta has been working on these issues for quite some time with you and the area in central california. by the way, thank you for support on the veterans skills jon that was assigned this week into the law a good bipartisan effort that we worked on. after our afghanistan try and another issue that came up during the same trip was working with our veterans that on the active duty with the general bostick afterwards he had said that this is the number one issue the evaluation process before they get discharged making sure not a day goes by that they are having to wait for disability or the issue of 20,000 non-deployable men and women that are disabled on active duty, so he said was the number-one issue dealing with the legislative issue that needs to be fixed back in 1940 and the question that i would have to you is what can we get done and what would be your recommendation and what is the legislative fix that you need us to pass the would help with this overall disability evaluation system? >> my view is that one of the most important things we can do is address the wounded warriors and
on the board of directors for sutter health, the largest not-for-profit health care organization in california. we've known for a long time that we have to have affordable, quality health care. when joseph asked about the responsibilities, it's all of our responsibilities. under the affordable care act, i think it was the first beginning of what we need to do in order to reform our health care system to make it affordable for all of us. i really like the ability to put my two boys back onto the health care system that we have today until they're 6. i also -- 26. i also like the ability to make sure no one's a slave to their job when it comes to pre-existing conditions. you know, health care is a big deal, but whether it's governor romney becomes president, we're going to have romneycare or we're going to have obamacare, because we need to solve this problem, and we need to solve it immediately. it's a collaborative effort between private, public, state can and local -- state and local government and the federal government. >> moderator: senator hatch? hatch: well, the so-called affordable care
, places like southern california and the seattle area where boeing -- and also in missouri where they build some of the military aircraft. but it's the minority of the states in the country. and the notion that this spreads all over the place is not borne up by the few actual surveys that have been done. the pentagon was forced to do some years ago a study on subcontracting, and they found that these main areas where the prime contracts were also received many of the subcontracts. so i think there is more of a concentration of pentagon spending than would be suggested. and then in the areas like virginia where senator mccain, senator kelly ayotte of new hampshire, senator lindsey graham of south carolina, you know, took the scare tour and talked about shipbuilding, talked about military bases, talked about defense consulting firms in northern virginia, um, that argument didn't fly in the elections even though they tried to pin these potential effects on president obama. he carried virginia. and i think the reason for that is that the potential effects were not as deep as advertis
say on a personal level when he was out in the wilds of california which is someplace beyond the appalachians, i think -- [laughter] i used to turn to his writings when he was at rand to really understand what was going on in northeast asia. i didn't know him then. but i was always, i found myself always in agreement which, of course, moment his writing was really terrific. [laughter] but without further ado, jeff, please. >> um, thanks, alan. and it's daunting coming up here after that first really outstanding panel which had three presentations which each took different perspectives on the situation in the wake of the party congress and complemented each other really magnificently. i want to say briefly at the outset how i see the current shape of the u.s./china relationship. i see it as basically in decent shape. i don't see the downward spiral or rising confrontation that i read about frequently in the media and some scowly commentary both in the united states and in china. to illustrate that, "the new york times" over the weekend had an article about president obama's cu
is the place. and highly mobile labor pool. california and texas in vermont have to have some sense, some common basis of knowledge. the national governors' association, a local initiative, i hope we have more discussion how to make certain implements. >> when you talk about self-esteem, working in the united kingdom. a kenna-12 system goes to the heart of it. the deep belief we need to develop a kid at self-esteem so she can perform. we need to reverse that and tell people they need to perform in order to have self-esteem. it is critically important, elevating standards is important. three things have the potential they are not easy to achieve, but could change the system. if i could wave a wand tomorrow i would make a-12 teachers america's heroes. they would be the profession we all aspire to. they would be seen in places like japan where they call teachers since reflecting what they call lawyers, doctors, university professors, the difference between we view university professors in america and the way we view k-12 teachers and places like finland have this right and we haven't 100% wr
and california. they make the decisions. the politics you see on the media which they own and manipulate and make believe the two parties which are really one party, the donkeys face an elephant face, and i am running to reveal the truth about all of these so we can deal with reality instead of the fake democracy. sanders: it's the economy. we have almost 15% of working people in this country that are either unemployed or underemployed and 50 million people with no health insurance and median family income has gone down by some $4,000 in the last ten years. i am going to work very hard to continue my efforts for the millions of jobs that our country desperately needs by rebuilding our infrastructure and putting a whole lot of people back to work building the roads and the water systems and the bridges. we've got to transform our energy system away from fossil fuel, energy efficiency and sustainable energy when you do that you create a lot of jobs and we need to free think our disastrous trade policies which have led to the outsourcing of millions of jobs and we have to take on wall street and get
, it was the marriage amendment in california. and if you look at why it won, because it was a crossover of hispanics and most especially black pastors that joined the republicans. is so rather than look at hispanics and blacks from the standpoint of what we white people want to look at, why not ask them what they're interested in? why not look at their values and their cultural agenda and their priorities and address that? and that's where there's great common ground, and i simply don't understand why republicans seemingly are afraid of their own shadow when it comes to that. >> [inaudible] briefly touched on. in the first national election, race and gay marriage, there were a couple ballot initiatives that were successful in that regard. is gay marriage accepted in mainstream america, and -- [inaudible] toward the conservative movement? >> this is an issue that is very much under debate. you're right, there were four blue states yesterday that approved gay marriage, most of them by very, very narrow margins that were far less than the margins in the state legislatures of some of those states. what
pipeline, particularly in various parts of the country, but i look at california where we have such immense success. two women senators. we have a freight -- great female delegation out there but we also have folks who have been there for 20 years. many are elected 20 years ago. how long are they going to stay? are we prepared for that? that is our next piece and we will be. >> great. this was sort of a perception in some parts of the country this was a good year for women because a couple of men said a couple of dumb things. dawn, is that true? was this about a couple of men saying a couple of dumb things? >> they did say dumb things, let's be clear but this year of the woman part because i think that goes to it i pick up on your analogy, this year women went viral. the same way the media landscape is fractured. i think you could say this was the year of the woman candidate part two. this was the year of the younger woman. this is the year of the diverse woman. this is the year of women's uteruses. it was a lot of different levels of women got involved in a way that i think 20 years ago it
: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. boxer: i would ask that the quorum call be dispensed with, please. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. boxer: thank you so much, mr. president. just in the lull here and if there is any legislative business to take place, i will immediately give up the floor, but in this lull i just want to make a point. i am so proud to be in this senate, so proud to be here for a long time now, came here in 1993, there were two women, we went to six women, now we're going to 20 women and i've seen changes and i've seen good things and i've seen rough things. but i have to say one of the things that keeps coming up continually here is folks trying to use these debates on bills to add irrelevant amendments, amendments that have nothing to do with the topic at hand. i think we all agree that defending our nation is our number-one priority, and therefore having a defense authorization bill is very, very important. and i'm sure that we don't agree with every single sentence of this bill, but in general we all wa
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